Scientific Ice Cream

Scientific Ice Cream

This is the perfect activity for a hot summer’s day!

What do I need?

  • Milkshake
  • ice cubes
  • table salt
  • small and large
    sandwich bag
  • tea towel or gloves

Safety First!

Always ask your grown-up to help you. Your safety is your responsibility. This experiment gets very cold always protect your hands with a towel
or gloves.

How do I do it?

  1. Pour about 100ml of milkshake into the small
    sandwich bag and seal well (nobody wants salty ice cream);
  2. Put about 10-20 ice cubes in the large sandwich bag
    and add about 50g of table salt to the large
    sandwich bag
  3. Put the small sandwich bag inside the large sandwich
    bag, seal the large sandwich bag, squash the salty
    ice around your milkshake for between 5-10 minutes –
    use a tea towel as it gets painfully cold;
  4. Once you can feel that your milkshake has solidified your good to retrieve the small bag and eat your ice cream!

What’s going on?

Salt lowers the freezing point of ice and this causes the ice to melt, as the water surrounds your milkshake it is still below zero degrees celcius and causes the milkshake to freeze.

Take it further!

  • Do different milkshakes take a different amount of time freeze?
  • Try different liquids. Orange Juice? Lemonade?

 

If you enjoyed this activity why not check out The Academy?!

 

Ice Luminary

Ice Luminary

You have got to have a little patience for this one, but trust me the results are spectacular!

What do I need?

  • Two plastic bowls (one which fits inside the other)
  • Marbles/stones
  • Christmas items (foliage, tinsel etc)
  • Duct tape
  • Boiled cooled water
  • Freezer
  • Tea light

Safety First!

Always ask your grown-up to help you. Hazards include: boiling water, ice (very cold and slippery), if using a real candle (flame and hot wax).

How do I do it?

  1. Gather some festive items (they will get wet and may get ruined). Feel free to experiment with natural and synthetic materials.
  2. Place your small containers in the large one (add some marbles or stones to weight it down).
  3. Put items in the gap between the two containers.
  4. Add cooled boiled water; Tape your smaller container in place (you want it to float a little so your luminary has a base).
  5. Pop in the freezer overnight.
  6. Remove from freezer, allow to thaw a little so you can remove the containers. Try to be patient as using warm water to release may cause cracks in your luminary.
  7. Add a tea light (real or battery powered) and enjoy!

What’s going on?

Boiling water before you freeze it can remove some of the air. Air is a mixture of gases including nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide. With less gas trapped inside the ice it becomes more clear.

Take it further!

  • Make a bowl shaped one and enjoy eating a frozen dessert out of it like ice cream.
  • What effects can you achieve if you add food colouring or biodegradable glitter?
  • In Scandinavian countries these ice lanterns are left outside on doorsteps – how long will your last outside?

 

If you enjoyed this activity why not check out The Academy?!